FACTORS IN SELECTING OT LIGHTS

An insight into OT lights


OT lights are the most prominent aid parallel with the surgical equipments for medical practitioners. They are used by clinicians, surgeons and proceduralists in emergency rooms, labor and delivery, examination room, etc. OT light is a medical device intended to illuminate a local area or cavity of the patient to assist medical practitioners during a surgical procedure. It is very essential to provide an excellent source of light during various medical procedures like dental treatment, surgery, examination rooms etc. Hence, they must be designed in a favorable manner as it is extremely critical for staff comfort and patient’s safety.

Types Of OT Lights


OT lights can be categorized by lamp type or mounting configuration. Two lamp types are conventional (halogen) and LED (light emitting diode).
OT lighting configurations may include ceiling-mounted, wall-mounted, or on floor stand

  • Shadow-Less OT Lights
  • OT Light without Camera
  • OT Light with Camera

Problems Associated with OT lights

  • Surgeons experience eyestrain and light load on operating continuously for long hours
  • Heating of LED
  • Blocking of lights
  • Breakage of wire inside the equipment
  • Failure of slip ring, fuse, lamp or insulation
  • Failure of electronic devices
  • Power supply cable detachment

Because surgical lighting is complex, sophisticated and often customized for an operating room an efficient illumination needs adequate balance of luminance, temperature, weight and shadow management. Considering these factors will effectively reduce errors and minimize eye fatigue, a main factor in performing successful and safe procedures.

Factors in selecting OT Lights

  • Lux: Unit for the amount of visible light measured by a luxmeter at a certain point.
  • Central illuminance (Ec): Illuminance (measured in lux) at 1m distance from the light emitting surface in the light field center.
  • Light field center : Point in the light field (lighted area) where illuminance reaches maximum lux intensity. It is the reference point for most measurements.
  • Depth of illumination: The distance between the points of 20% illumination intensity above and below the center point. Successful illumination requires a special balance of luminance, shadow management, volume, and temperature. This maximizes visibility at the surgical site while minimizing eye fatigue
  • Shadow dilution: The light’s ability to minimize the effect of obstructions.
  • Light field diameter
  • (D10): Diameter of light field around the light field center, ending where the illuminance reaches 10% of Ec. The value reported is the average of four different cross sections through the light field center.
  • D50: Diameter of light field around the light field center, ending where the illuminance reaches 50% of Ec. The value reported is the average of four different cross sections through the light field center.
  • Power : 100-240 VAC, 50/60 Hz
  • Heat Management: Light will be always energy so in order to prevent from tissue desiccation, a safe heat management is mandatory. Heat can be measured in two places: at the light patch, and at the light head. Heat can cause discomfort for the surgeon, and can dry exposed patient tissue. A quality surgical light will minimize heat to improve comfort and patient outcomes.